Time to abolish the MTC

It is time to abolish the MTC. Acting without the support of voters, the Bay Area’s Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has spent money recklessly and abused its powers.

In 2011, MTC’s directors decided to spend $180 million for a new San Francisco headquarters that is scheduled to open in 2015. The current headquarters is in Oakland.

On March 26, 2014, the online edition of the Sacramento Bee reported that the MTC has approved a plan to require, by September 30, all San Francisco Bay Area businesses with more than 50 full-time employees to offer “commuter subsidies” to encourage employees to use public transportation instead of driving automobiles. The subsidies may require businesses to pay $75 per month per employee.

Created in 1970 by the California State Legislature, the MTC is responsible for transportation planning in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

MTC is run by a board of commissioners made up largely of locally elected officials. The commissioners themselves are not elected directly by voters. For example, the MTC’s chairperson is Amy Worth, a member of the Orinda City Council. Voters did not elect Ms. Worth’s to her MTC position.

Other MTC commission members include Tom Bates, the mayor of Berkeley, Federal Glover, a member of the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors, and Jean Quan, the mayor of Oakland.

MTC’s responsibilities go beyond transportation. In conjunction with another regional government entity, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), MTC, according to its Web site, has extensive involvement in local communities’ planning activities. Some of MTC’s and ABAG’s goals are to increase the supply of affordable housing and boost ridership on public transit.

In 2013, employers of BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) went on strike twice. Can Bay Area residents be confident that public transportation will be available when needed?

MTC and ABAG have enormous power. However, this power has no political legitimacy because this power is wielded by individuals who were not elected directly by voters.

In 1776, the United States declared independence from an autocratic English monarch, King George III. Bay Area residents must ask themselves if that democracy called America has been subverted by unelected officials.Acting without the support of voters, the Bay Area’s Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has spent money recklessly and abused its powers.

In 2011, MTC’s directors decided to spend $180 million for a new San Francisco headquarters that is scheduled to open in 2015. The current headquarters is in Oakland.

Bay-Bridge-Bike-laneOn March 24, 2014, the online edition of the San Francisco Chronicle reported that a $9.4 million bicycle pathway for the Bay Bridge will, after seven months of operation, be torn down. A new pathway is planned. MTC’s executive director, Steve Heminger, defended the action, telling the Chronicle, “This bridge has always been about access for all kinds of travel modes, not just automobiles.”

On March 26, 2014, the online edition of the Sacramento Bee reported that the MTC has approved a plan to require, by September 30, all San Francisco Bay Area businesses with more than 50 full-time employees to offer “commuter subsidies” to encourage employees to use public transportation instead of driving automobiles. The subsidies may require businesses to pay $75 per month per employee.

Created in 1970 by the California State Legislature, the MTC is responsible for transportation planning in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

MTC is run by a board of commissioners made up largely of locally elected officials. The commissioners themselves are not elected directly by voters. For example, the MTC’s chairperson is Amy Worth, a member of the Orinda City Council. Voters did not elect Ms. Worth’s to her MTC position.

Other MTC commissions are Tom Bates, the mayor of Berkeley, Federal Glover, a member of the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors, and Jean Quan, the mayor of Oakland.

MTC’s responsibilities go beyond transpiration. In conjunction with another regional government entity, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), MTC, according to its Web site, has extensive involvement in local communities’ planning activities. Some of MTC’s and ABAG’s goals are to increase the supply of affordable housing and boost ridership on public transit.

In 2013, employers of BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) went on strike twice. Can Bay Area residents be confident that public transportation will be available when needed?

MTC and ABAG have enormous power. However, this power has no political legitimacy because this power is wielded by individuals who were not elected directly by voters.

In 1776, the United States declared independence from an autocratic English monarch, King George III. Bay Area residents must ask themselves if that democracy called America has been subverted by unelected officials.

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